BEST HOT DOG RESULTS




THE BEST HOTDOG ON THE PLANET

It’s a religious thing…


WILL ANYONE EVER BEAT THE BIGGLY MOUTH?

👺 Joey “Jaws” Chestnut ate 71 wieners and buns to secure his 12th title at Nathan’s Famous annual July Fourth hot dog eating contest on Thursday, just a few hot dogs shy of breaking the record he set last year.

In front of a crowd of fans and facing 17 opponents, the California native far exceeded his nearest competitors, but didn’t quite make or pass the 74-dog mark he reached in 2018.  

When asked how he felt after the contest, Chestnut, 35, said, “I feel like I should eat a couple more”.  What a champ, I’d like to know the name of his gastroentonologist and the name of the plumber he uses…

😇  HOTDOG WARS -  On our website for food at aljacobskitchen.com … We just engaged in testing for HOTDOG WARS.   We have endorsed Hebrew National as the Chef Jacobs Hotdog of choice,  because it contains no strange chemistry  (Note:  it is not used by Nathan’s, they got a deal by a different supplier ).  

If you knew what was in some of the others you might change your thinking too.  Hebrew National is certified 100% Kosher meaning the meat used from the cows is cut according to stringent rules of slaughter, inspection and subject to KASHRUTH law and prohibits parts of the cow like it’s rump, ass, tail, legs, head, teats, ears, nothing basically south of the last rib and only the brisket forward of the first rib. 


MEAT COWS ARE SECTIONED FOR VARIOUS USES


THERE ARE SEVERAL POINTS OF INFORMATION HERE


STEAK AND SHAKE IS A FRAUD

Steakburgers are a trademarked name for a hamburger that owes its name to founder Gus Belt’s practice of grinding round, sirloin and T-bone steaks (there is also a T-Bone pot roast cut)  into burgers in full view of customers.  Smart, he was a showman, took the rib-side, the upper ass or the rump and the lower ass, or the round.

Basically just take the left side of the NO’s shown below and that is a Steakburger.

The T-Bone with waste from the bone gets thrown in. Most folks don’t know one cut of meat from another so it looked like they were getting top notch burger meat.  You were and still are getting (Pun) the Bullshitted end of the meat.

Today it takes a lot more parts to feed those machines that Steak and Shake uses to make the  “hockey pucks” they form for shipping.   Basically cheaper cuts to feed an operation this size with 400 locations and strict company policies can’t do that today so maybe the mix has expanded...

Even butcher shops, standalone, if you can find one, or chain stores like Sam’s cut behind glass for reasons of cleanliness and sanitorial concerns.  But you never see the whole operation.   And there is the question of  round and sirloin being the caboose of the cow train. Thats what get put into Steak and Shake “Steak burgers”. 

Steak burgers is a lie, implying that steak only is used in their burger.  True it is steak if it came from slabs of beef, you  could cut the nose to the neck in strips and call it steak and then grind it.  But there are parts far more expensive in a cow that we associate with quality cuts.  (SEE BURGER WARS)

Great marketing, they have been doing it for years and the public doesn’t know the difference.  Just like the voting booth, most vote by name recognition, not the quality of the public servant running for office.  Both are lies and liars. As my associate called it with fast food meat you get the bull but the sh*t goes along with it…


HEBREW NATIONAL ONLY USES THESE CUTS IN WHITE - NO EXCEPTIONS ALLOWED


BASICALLY A GOOD STEAK IN AN EASY TO COOK PACKAGE



Frankly it comes at a price, about 16% higher.  Hebrew National HotDogs cost more because you are getting premium beef in a hotdog without the chemistry and spices needed by the competition for taste.  

The only ingredients in Hebrew National Hotdogs are Garlic, Paprika, and a preservative for storage.  Whereas the rest of the cow is sold else where like for pet food or to Steak and Shake who claim it’s Steakburger.  I suppose “ Rumpburger” would not sell.


WHAT IS TRIANGLE K SUPERVISION?

The Triangle K symbol is a trademarked logo that signifies “kashruth” (kosher) as defined by the most stringent Jews who follow Orthodox Jewish Law. It's a symbol of integrity, representing the most trusted and reliable name in strict rabbinical food certification and supervision. For more than half a century, Triangle K has been committed to making kosher food products available to people around the world.

MANUFACTURING KOSHER

While there might be slight variations from plant to plant, the requirements for the manufacture of all kosher food are based on the same fundamental principle of Jewish Dietary Laws: only kosher ingredients processed in kosher equipment.

INVESTIGATION OF MANUFACTURING FACILITIES

First, a special supervisor, the mashgiach, or an ordained Orthodox rabbi conducts an investigation of the plant and its procedures, as well as the ingredients, equipment, and processes used in the production of the product.

If the preliminary investigation indicates acceptable ingredients and procedures, the manufacturer is informed as to the nature of rabbinical supervision required for the food product for a specific period of time. Each individual food product must be inspected and certified separately, and the certification process is ongoing; each product must be inspected every year.

KOSHER LAW ENFORCEMENT

In an effort to protect kosher-observant consumers, kosher laws have been incorporated into various state codes. For example, in New York, the Kosher Law Enforcement Division (KLED) is maintained to aid its large Jewish population and protect consumers from the mislabeling and misrepresentation of food products. A division of the state's Department of Agriculture and Markets, KLED's tasks include ensuring that businesses selling any item with kosher certification—particularly meat and poultry products—adhere to the state's labeling laws. Rabbi Rubin stated, “We feel the consumer is to be protected. If a market section says it is kosher, it should be kosher without the buyer having to carefully check the ingredients.”

The legal protection for kosher consumers was first introduced into American law in 1915. According to Kashrus, “New York has continued its leadership role by setting standards for the development of new ways to guard against fraud and misrepresentation in the sales and distribution of kosher food.” KLED laws require that meat and meat parts (including poultry) be identified as kosher through the use of tags and plumbas. The regulations also address the procedures to be followed with respect to the required washing of meat and the method of transportation.