ROAST CHICKEN TRUTH



NEW!  COSTCO ROAST CHICKEN FROM THE BIG 

THREE WAS THE WINNER

WE PUT COSTCO, SAMS CLUB AND PUBLIX TO THE TEST


We compared;  Size;  Evenness of Cooking;  Color (Appeal); Taste: and a simple series of questions… Which did you like the most?  Whose Chicken passed muster?  Which one would you buy for your family?

And to be fair we will do this three times and the third with three blind tastersIt will take three weeks, only can eat so much chicken… Any more and I’ll be laying eggs.

On this sample and the competition, the skin was removed, not a fan favorite for the calorie concious.  Only usable chicken meat sculpted off the bone with in reason was re-weighed at 2.6 pounds, no bones, no skin, cartilage or fat, no unusable meat,  average cutting of usable meat, and all cooked thoroughly…

Basically the container top / bottom and bones, skeleton, useless meat and liquid. Very nice for a three pound and change package to retain 2.6 usable.

3.13 - 2.6 lbs usable =  including container and liquid…


ROUND ONE:  PRESENTATION     

1)  COSTCO  = GOOD TO EXCELLENT and PREFERRED by those customers and our staff 

2)  SAM’S =  UNDERCOOKED, MANY COMPLAINTS, and too over seasoned, Viable sources from staff    documented dissatisfaction with undercooked product, taste and consistency.

3) PUBLIX SUPERMARKET = UNDERWEIGHT,  and OVERPRICED, PLUS Overcooked or old in the bins 

   ROUND TWO:  TASTE and ROUND THREE:  OVERALL ENJOYMENT

SAME RESULTS IN ORDER - NO FURTHER TESTING NEEDED

COSTO WAS BEST - ALL TESTERS AGREED


IT'S ONLY $4.99. BUT COSTCO’S ROTISSERIE

CHICKEN COMES AT A HUGE PRICE

At the back of Costco’s stores, past the televisions, jewelry, jumbo-sized ketchup jugs and tubs of mixed nuts, is one of the retailer's most prized items: The rotisserie chicken that costs just $4.99.

Cheap Kirkland Signature rotisserie chickens aren't only a quick way for families to get dinner on the table. For Costco, the chickens are a lure, pulling customers into stores and getting them to browse the aisles, adding sometimes hundreds of dollars worth of items to their shopping carts before they pick up that bird.

The chickens have become almost a cult item. 91 million were sold last year, double the number from a decade earlier. They have their own Facebook page with nearly 13,000 followers.

So Costco is willing to go to extreme lengths to keep its chickens at $4.99. For the past few years, it's been recruiting farmers for this moment:   The official opening of a sprawling, $450 million poultry complex of its very own in Nebraska.

It's a highly unusual move for one of the world's largest retailers. Costco will control the production process from farm to store, making key decisions down to the grain chickens eat and the type of eggs hatched. Costco has even put its socially-conscious corporate reputation on the line, fending off local critics who have rallied against the Nebraska operation.

This is a big experiment not only for Costco, but the broader industry as well. Retailers will be watching Costco's plan closely. It's one of the largest-scale tests of a store's ability to become its own meat supplier. And there's no guarantee it will work.

Costco's $4.99 birds. The company sold more than 90 million rotisserie chickens last year.  Costco is so determined to keep its rotisserie chickens at $4.99 that it's been willing to lose money selling them in the past. Even as competitors increased their rotisserie chickens to $5.99 in recent years, Costco held its price steady.

“As prices changed dramatically and we saw the competition raising the price, it was a hot price," Costco's chief financial officer Richard Galanti said in 2014.  Costco was willing to sacrifice "$30 million, $40 million a year on gross margin by keeping it at $4.99," Galanti said the following year. "That is what we do for a living."

Jeff Lyons, senior vice president of fresh foods at Costco, who joined the company in 1990 as its first meat buyer, declined to say whether Costco still loses money selling them. But rotisserie chickens have been a "very, very good business and very consistent growth for a long period of time," he said. "We're right about 100 million right now."

But in recent years, it has become even more difficult for Costco to keep its rotisserie chicken prices down. Americans are eating more chicken than ever before, and the company faces supply challenges and cost pressures in the highly concentrated poultry industry.

A small number of massive producers dominate America's chicken supply: Tyson, Pilgrim's Pride, Sanderson Farms, Perdue and Koch Foods. Together, those companies control more than 60% of America’s $65 billion poultry market, according to Watt Poultry, a meat industry publication.    "A more consolidated industry has more bargaining power against its customers," said Timothy Ramey, a longtime poultry industry analyst.

Costco wants to reduce its reliance on those big producers.  Traditional chicken suppliers are also producing fewer birds to be sold as rotisserie chickens.